Acts 27:27-28:11

27When the fourteenth night had come, as we were drifting across the sea of Adria, about midnight the sailors suspected that they were nearing land.28So they took soundings and found twenty fathoms; a little farther on they took soundings again and found fifteen fathoms.29Fearing that we might run on the rocks, they let down four anchors from the stern and prayed for day to come.30But when the sailors tried to escape from the ship and had lowered the boat into the sea, on the pretext of putting out anchors from the bow,31Paul said to the centurion and the soldiers, “Unless these men stay in the ship, you cannot be saved.”32Then the soldiers cut away the ropes of the boat and set it adrift.33Just before daybreak, Paul urged all of them to take some food, saying, “Today is the fourteenth day that you have been in suspense and remaining without food, having eaten nothing.34Therefore I urge you to take some food, for it will help you survive; for none of you will lose a hair from your heads.”35After he had said this, he took bread; and giving thanks to God in the presence of all, he broke it and began to eat.36Then all of them were encouraged and took food for themselves.37(We were in all two hundred seventy-six persons in the ship.)38After they had satisfied their hunger, they lightened the ship by throwing the wheat into the sea.The Shipwreck 39In the morning they did not recognize the land, but they noticed a bay with a beach, on which they planned to run the ship ashore, if they could.40So they cast off the anchors and left them in the sea. At the same time they loosened the ropes that tied the steering-oars; then hoisting the foresail to the wind, they made for the beach.41But striking a reef, they ran the ship aground; the bow stuck and remained immovable, but the stern was being broken up by the force of the waves.42The soldiers' plan was to kill the prisoners, so that none might swim away and escape;43but the centurion, wishing to save Paul, kept them from carrying out their plan. He ordered those who could swim to jump overboard first and make for the land,44and the rest to follow, some on planks and others on pieces of the ship. And so it was that all were brought safely to land.Chapter 28Paul on the Island of Malta 1After we had reached safety, we then learned that the island was called Malta.2The natives showed us unusual kindness. Since it had begun to rain and was cold, they kindled a fire and welcomed all of us around it.3Paul had gathered a bundle of brushwood and was putting it on the fire, when a viper, driven out by the heat, fastened itself on his hand.4When the natives saw the creature hanging from his hand, they said to one another, “This man must be a murderer; though he has escaped from the sea, justice has not allowed him to live.”5He, however, shook off the creature into the fire and suffered no harm.6They were expecting him to swell up or drop dead, but after they had waited a long time and saw that nothing unusual had happened to him, they changed their minds and began to say that he was a god.7Now in the neighborhood of that place were lands belonging to the leading man of the island, named Publius, who received us and entertained us hospitably for three days.8It so happened that the father of Publius lay sick in bed with fever and dysentery. Paul visited him and cured him by praying and putting his hands on him.9After this happened, the rest of the people on the island who had diseases also came and were cured.10They bestowed many honors on us, and when we were about to sail, they put on board all the provisions we needed.Paul Arrives at Rome 11Three months later we set sail on a ship that had wintered at the island, an Alexandrian ship with the Twin Brothers as its figurehead.