Mesopotamia

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Mesopotamia, “the land between rivers,” (modern day Iraq) is the birthplace of the earliest civilizations on the planet. For millennia, the great ancient Mesopotamian civilizations each had their time to flourish and leave their mark on history. First, in the fourth millennium B.C.E., it was the non-Semitic Sumerians, who built Uruk, one of the first urbanized cities. In the third millennium, the Semitic Akkadians would gain prominence, and though the Sumerians disappeared from the pages of history, the Semitic people preserved the Sumerians’ culture and literature for generations. In turn, the civilizations of the Babylonians and Assyrians (named after their capital Assur) would flourish in the second millennium, carrying on the rich cultural and literary traditions left behind by the Sumerians and Akkadians. Ultimately, these nations would birth some of the ancient world’s most bellicose empires, the Neo-Assyrian (centered at Nineveh) and Neo-Babylonian Empires, which dominated the early first millennium B.C.E. The Neo-Assyrians rose to power and conquered much of the ancient Near East (including Israel and most of Judah) with an army more advanced than any the world had ever seen. The Neo-Assyrian Empire began to fall due to internal conflict, and was eventually defeated by the Neo-Babylonians in spite of help from the Egyptian army at the famous battle of Carchemish in 605 B.C.E. (Jer 46:1-2). Less than 100 years later, the Persians, whose capital was Susa, would defeat the Babylonians, and effectively put an end to the Mesopotamian dominance that marked so much of antiquity.

A region notable for its early ancient civilizations, geographically encompassing the modern Middle East, Egypt, and modern Turkey.

The historical period from the beginning of Western civilization to the start of the Middle Ages.

People from the region of northern Mesopotamia that includes modern-day Iraq, Syria, Jordan and Lebanon.

Of or relating to ancient lower Mesopotamia and its empire centered in Babylon.

Residents of the ancient Mesopotamian city of Babylon, also used to refer to the population of the larger geographical designation of lower Mesopotamia.

A broad, diverse group of nations ruled by the government of a single nation.

Of or related to the written word, especially that which is considered literature; literary criticism is a interpretative method that has been adapted to biblical analysis.

Jer 46:1-2

Judgment on Egypt


1The word of the Lord that came to the prophet Jeremiah concerning the nations.

2Concerning Egypt, about the army of Pharaoh Neco, king of Egyp ... View more

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