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Akhenaten

Limestone stela of Akhenaten

Akhenaten, Tell el-Amarna, Egypt, 18th dynasty, around 1340 B.C.E. Limestone stela, British Museum, London.

When Akhenaten became pharaoh he moved the entire court from Thebes to El Amarna and proclaimed "the Aten" (the visible sun itself) to be the sole deity. In this stele Akhenaten is sitting on a low chair with the Aten disk above him, in the center of the stele. The hands at the ends of the suns rays reach out to bless him. Hieroglyphic inscriptions incised around the relief give the names and titles of Akhenaten, Nefertiti and the Aten.

An Egyptian archaeological site built by Akhenaten and notable for its cache of ancient diplomatic letters.

The Egyptian sun god, who was particularly venerated by the monotheist Pharaoh Akhenaten.

A sequence of rulers from the same family.

Short written texts, generally inscribed on stone or clay and frequently recording an event or dedicating an object.

Short written texts, generally inscribed on stone or clay and frequently recording an event or dedicating an object.

An upright stone slab usually inscribed or carved for commemorative purposes.

An alternate spelling for "tel" meaning a mound or hill-shaped site containing several occupational layers one on top of the other over milennia.

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