Ishtar Gate Reconstruction

Reconstruction of the Ishtar Gate, built in Babylon around 575 B.C.E. by King Nebuchadnezzar II. Pergamon Museum, Berlin.

The reconstruction of the Ishtar Gate at the Pergamon Museum provides a glimpse of the imposing entrance to the north side of the ancient city of Babylon, constructed under Nebuchadnezzar II in 575 B.C.E. Ishtar, the goddess to whom the gate was dedicated, was the Babylonian goddess of fertility, love, and war. The gate was constructed of glazed brick of a deep lapis-lazuli color, with alternating rows of yellow dragons and aurochs, an extinct ancestor of today’s domestic cattle, in bas-relief. Beyond the gate was a great processional way lined with 120 bas-relief lions and floral motifs. This reconstruction uses the remains excavated by Robert Koldewey in the early 20th century.

Reconstruction of the Ishtar Gate, built in Babylon around 575 B.C.E. by King Nebuchadnezzar II. Pergamon Museum, Berlin.

Of or relating to ancient lower Mesopotamia and its empire centered in Babylon.

Dug up, often from an archaeological site.

A recurring element or symbolism in artwork, literature, and other forms of expression.

 NEH Logo
Bible Odyssey has been made possible in part by the National Endowment for the Humanities: Exploring the human endeavor
Any views, findings, conclusions, or recommendations expressed in this website, do not necessarily represent those of the National Endowment for the Humanities.