Antioch Roman Road

Ancient Roman road connecting the towns of Antioch and Chalcis, near the modern site of Tall Aqibrin in Syria. Photograph by Bernard Gagnon.

The early Roman emperors saw the ancient city of Antioch, near the modern border between Syria and Turkey, as a strategic capital for the eastern part of the Roman Empire. Great building projects were undertaken to make Antioch an Eastern version of Rome. Edward Gibbon, author of The Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire, described Antioch as a place where “fashion was the only law, pleasure the only pursuit, and the splendor of dress and furniture was the only distinction of the citizens of Antioch.” An earthquake in 37 C.E., and another in 115 C.E. during a war against Parthia, destroyed much of the city. The emperor Trajan and his successor, Hadrian, would restore the city to its glory. 

Ancient Roman road connecting the towns of Antioch and Chalcis, near the modern site of Tall Aqibrin in Syria.

A broad, diverse group of nations ruled by the government of a single nation.

The territories ruled by ancient Rome, from roughly 27 B.C.E. to 476 C.E., encompassing terrorities in Europe, Africa, and Asia.

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