Contributors

Meet Bible Odyssey Website contributors and find out more about their research and publications.

« Previous ... 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80  ... Next » 
  • Michael Pregill

    Michael Pregill Associate Professor,  Elon University

    Michael Pregill is associate professor in the Department of Religious Studies at Elon University in North Carolina. His main areas of specialization are the Qur’an and its interpretation, the origins of Islam in the late antique milieu, and Muslim relations with non-Muslims. Much of his research focuses on the reception of biblical, Jewish, and Christian traditions in the Qur’an and Islamic discourse. He is a frequent contributor to the Encyclopedia of the Bible and Its Reception.

    Bible Odyssey Content:

  • quick-laura

    Laura Quick Assistant Professor of Religion and Judaic Studies,  Princeton University

    Laura Quick is an Assistant Professor of Religion and Judaic Studies at Princeton University, where she specializes in the Hebrew Bible and related literature. She is interested in the production, consumption, and transformation of sacred texts by religious communities in the ancient world, which is the topic of her recent book, Deuteronomy 28 and the Aramaic Curse Tradition (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2017). She is currently working on projects looking at scribal culture in ancient Israel and Judah and at the body as an agent in the communication of social and sexual identities.

    Bible Odyssey Content:

  • Brian Rainey

    Brian Rainey Associate Professor,  Princeton Theological Seminary

    Brian Rainey is associate professor of Old Testament at Princeton Theological Seminary.

    Bible Odyssey Content:

  • Rawson-A Paige

    A. Paige Rawson Visiting Assistant Professor of Religion,  Wingate University

    A. Paige Rawson is a Visiting Assistant Professor of Religion at Wingate University in Wingate, N.C. She is the author of “(Re)Membering Samson OtherWise: Resistance, Revolution, and Relationality in a Rastafari Reading of Judges 13-16,” in Human Rights, Race and Resistance in the African Diaspora (2016). Her research eschews traditional Western European methodologies in favor of the oraliturary interpretation of the Hebrew Bible, Africana and Afro-Caribbean epistemologies, and Affect and Queer theories.

     

    Bible Odyssey Content:

 NEH Logo
Bible Odyssey has been made possible in part by the National Endowment for the Humanities: Exploring the human endeavor
Any views, findings, conclusions, or recommendations expressed in this website, do not necessarily represent those of the National Endowment for the Humanities.