Contributors

Meet Bible Odyssey Website contributors and find out more about their research and publications.

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  • seeman-chris

    Chris Seeman Associate Professor of Theology,  Walsh University

    Chris Seeman, PhD (2002), University of California at Berkeley, is Associate Professor of Theology at Walsh University in North Canton, Ohio. His publications include Rome and Judea in Transition: Hasmonean Relations with the Roman Republic and the Evolution of the High Priesthood (New York: Lang, 2013) and, with Paul Spilsbury, Flavius Josephus: Translation and Commentary, Judean Antiquities 11 (Leiden: Brill, 2017).

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  • Melvin Sensenig

    Melvin Sensenig Teacher,  Temple University and Albright College

    Melvin Sensenig teaches in the Religion Departments at Temple University and Albright College. He is the founding pastor of two urban churches, first at Trinity Presbyterian Church in Providence, Rhode Island, and then Christ Presbyterian Church in Reading, Pennsylvania, where he continues to serve as pastor.

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  • Choon-Leong Seow

    Choon-Leong Seow Professor,  Princeton Seminary

    Choon-Leong Seow is Princeton Seminary’s Henry Snyder Gehman Professor of Old Testament Language and Literature. An ordained Presbyterian elder, he specializes in the wisdom literature of the Old Testament, the history of ancient Israelite religion, Northwest Semitic philology, and the history of biblical interpretation and reception. He teaches courses on the interpretation of Job, Hebraica, Daniel, Aramaic, and Northwest Semitic epigraphy.

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  • sheinfeld-shayna

    Shayna Sheinfeld Visiting Researcher,  University of Kentucky

    Shayna Sheinfeld is visiting researcher at the University of Kentucky.

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