Contributors

Meet Bible Odyssey Website contributors and find out more about their research and publications.

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  • Cory Crawford

    Cory Crawford Assistant Professor,  Ohio University

    Cory Crawford is assistant professor of biblical studies in the Department of Classics and World Religions at Ohio University. He has published articles on iconography and sacred space in the Hebrew Bible and ancient Near East.

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  • James Crenshaw

    James Crenshaw Emeritus Professor,  Duke University

    James Crenshaw is the Robert L. Flowers Emeritus Professor of Old Testament at Duke University. He is the author of numerous scholarly articles and books, including Old Testament Wisdom (Westminster John Knox 2010), Defending God: Biblical Responses to the Problem of Evil (Oxford University Press, 2005), Qoheleth (University of South Carolina Press, 2013), and Reading Job (Smyth & Helwys, 2011).

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  • John Dominic Crossan

    John Dominic Crossan Emeritus Professor,  DePaul University

    John Dominic Crossan is an emeritus professor from DePaul University and author of numerous popular books on Jesus and the New Testament world. 

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  • John (Jack) Daniels

    John (Jack) Daniels Professor,  Flagler College

    John (Jack) Daniels is Teaching & Learning Librarian and an adjunct professor of religion at Flagler College in St. Augustine, Florida. He also serves on the faculty of the Ministry Formation Program for the Catholic Diocese of St. Augustine.  His current research interests include gossip and social identity in the Synoptic Gospels and Paul, and the intersection of theological discourse, identity, and mission. Daniels has written articles on gossip in the New Testament and in John, and most recently the book Gossiping Jesus: The Oral Processing of Jesus in John’s Gospel (Pickwick, 2013).

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