Contributors

Meet Bible Odyssey Website contributors and find out more about their research and publications.

Contributors starting with 'M'

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  • Dennis R. MacDonald

    Dennis R. MacDonald Professor,  Claremont School of Theology

    Dennis R. MacDonald is the John Wesley Professor of New Testament and Christian Origins at the Claremont School of Theology and the Claremont Lincoln University.

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  • Nathan MacDonald

    Nathan MacDonald Lecturer,  University of Cambridge

    Nathan MacDonald is university lecturer in Hebrew Bible at the University of Cambridge and a fellow of St. John's College. He previously held positions at the University of St. Andrews in Scotland and the University of Göttingen in Germany. His publications include What Did the Ancient Israelite Eat? Diet in Biblical Times (Eerdmans, 2008), Not Bread Alone: The Meaning of Food in the Old Testament (Oxford University Press, 2008), and Deuteronomy and the Meaning of “Monotheism” (Mohr Siebeck, 2003). 

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  • Aren M. Maeir

    Aren M. Maeir Professor,  Bar-Ilan University

    Aren M. Maeir is professor of archaeology at Bar-Ilan University and is the director of the Tell es-Safi/Gath Archaeological Project.

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  • Jodi Magness

    Jodi Magness Professor,  University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

    Jodi Magness is the Kenan Distinguished Professor for Teaching Excellence in Early Judaism in the Department of Religious Studies at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Magness is the author of The Archaeology of Qumran and the Dead Sea Scrolls (Eerdmans, 2002) and, most recently, The Archaeology of the Holy Land from the Destruction of Solomon’s Temple to the Muslim Conquest (Cambridge University Press, 2012). She produced a 36-lecture course entitled “The Holy Land Revealed” with The Teaching Company and will be featured in an IMAX film on Jerusalem.

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