Contributors

Meet Bible Odyssey Website contributors and find out more about their research and publications.

Contributors starting with 'E'

  • David L. Eastman

    David L. Eastman Associate Professor,  Ohio Wesleyan University

    David L. Eastman is associate professor of religion at Ohio Wesleyan University. In his research he employs archaeological, textual, liturgical, and artistic evidence for the study of early Christian constructions of identity, the cult of the saints, and the reception and expansion of the apostolic histories. He is the author of Paul the Martyr: The Cult of the Apostle in the Latin West (Society of Biblical Literature and Brill, 2011) and The Deaths of the Apostles: The Ancient Martyrdom Accounts of Peter and Paul (SBL Press, 2015).

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  • Jennie Ebeling

    Jennie Ebeling Associate Professor,  University of Evansville

    Jennie Ebeling is an associate professor of archaeology and chair of the Department of Archaeology and Art History at the University of Evansville in Indiana. Codirector of the Jezreel Expedition and a stone artifact specialist, Ebeling has edited volumes on household archaeology and ground stone artifacts and is the author of Women’s Lives in Biblical Times (T&T Clark, 2010).

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  • Bart D. Ehrman

    Bart D. Ehrman Professor,  University of North Carolina

    Bart D. Ehrman is the James A. Gray Distinguished Professor at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. His fields of scholarly expertise include the historical Jesus, the early Christian apocrypha, the apostolic fathers, and the manuscript tradition of the New Testament. He has published extensively in the fields of New Testament and Early Christianity, including four New York Times bestsellers: Jesus Interrupted (HarperOne), God's Problem (HarperCollins), Misquoting Jesus (HarperCollins), and Forged (HarperCollins). 

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  • Carlos Eire ,  

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