Three Biblical Canons

THREE BIBLICAL CANONS


JEWISH TANAKH

PROTESTANT
OLD TESTAMENT

 

CATHOLIC/ORTHODOX  OLD TESTAMENT

Torah/Instruction
Genesis
Exodus
Leviticus
Numbers
Deuteronomy

Nevi’im/Prophets
   (Former Prophets)
Joshua
Judges
Samuel
Kings

   (Latter Prophets)
Isaiah
Jeremiah
Ezekiel
Book of the Twelve
(which includes: 
      Hosea, Amos, Micah,
      Joel, Obadiah, Jonah,
      Nahum, Habakkuk,
      Zephaniah, Haggai,
      Zechariah, and Malachi)

Ketuvim/Writings
Psalms
Job
Proverbs
Ruth
Song of Songs
Ecclesiastes
Lamentations
Esther
Daniel
Ezra-Nehemiah
Chronicles

Pentateuch
Genesis
Exodus
Leviticus
Numbers
Deuteronomy

Historical Books
Joshua
Judges
Ruth
1 Samuel
2 Samuel
1 Kings
2 Kings
1 Chronicles
2 Chronicles
Ezra
Nehemiah
Esther

Poetic and Wisdom Books
Job
Psalms
Proverbs
Ecclesiastes
Song of Songs

Prophetic Books
Isaiah
Jeremiah
Lamentations
Ezekiel
Daniel
Hosea
Joel
Amos
Obadiah
Jonah
Micah
Nahum
Habakkuk
Zephaniah
Haggai
Zechariah
Malachi

Pentateuch
Genesis
Exodus
Leviticus
Numbers
Deuteronomy

Historical Books
Joshua
Judges
Ruth
1 Kings (1 Samuel)
2 Kings (2 Samuel)
3 Kings (1 Kings)
4 Kings (2 Kings)
1 Chronicles
2 Chronicles
1 Esdras (Ezra)
2 Esdras (Nehemiah)
Tobit
Judith
Esther with additions
1 Maccabees
2 Maccabees

Poetic and Wisdom Books
Job
Psalms
Proverbs
Ecclesiastes
Song of Songs
Wisdom of Solomon
Ecclesiasticus (Sirach)

Prophetic Books
Isaiah
Jeremiah
Lamentations
Baruch
Ezekiel
Daniel with additions
Hosea
Joel
Amos
Obadiah
Jonah
Micah
Nahum
Habakkuk
Zephaniah
Haggai
Zechariah
Malachi

, "Three Biblical Canons", n.p. [cited 25 Jun 2017]. Online: http://bibleodyssey.org/en/tools/bible-basics/three-biblical-canons

migration of the ancient Israelites from Egypt into Canaan

The books Joshua, Judges, Samuel, and Kings, which form the first half of the Prophets, the second of three sections of the Hebrew Bible.

Joshua, Judges, Samuel, Kings, and sometimes also includes Ezra-Neh and Chronicles.

Also called the Hebrew Bible, those parts of the canon that are common to both Jews and Christians. The designation "Old Testament" places this part of the canon in relation to the New Testament, the part of the Bible canonical only to Christians. Because the term "Old Testament" assumes a distinctly Christian perspective, many scholars prefer to use the more neutral "Hebrew Bible," which derives from the fact that the texts of this part of the canon are written almost entirely in Hebrew.

Of or belonging to any of several branches of Christianity, especially from Eastern Europe and the Middle East, whose adherents trace their tradition back to the earliest Christian communities. Lowercase ("orthodox"), this term means conforming with the dominant, sanctioned ideas or belief system.

Those biblical books written by or attributed to prophets such as Isaiah, Jeremiah, and Ezekiel.

An acronym for the Hebrew Bible (Old Testament), comprising Torah (Law), Nevi'im (Prophets), and Ketuvim (Writings).

Books of the Bible that are concerned with human wisdom and sapiential matters, including Proverbs, Ecclesiastes (Qohelet), Song of Songs, and Job, along with the Apocryphal books of Sirach and Wisdom of Solomon.

A Wisdom book located in the Apocrypha.

The third division of the Jewish canon, also called by the Hebrew name Ketuvim. The other two divisions are the Torah (Pentateuch) and Nevi'im (Prophets); together the three divisions create the acronym Tanakh, the Jewish term for the Hebrew Bible.

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