David and Goliath (1 Sam 17) by Keith Bodner

Some of the most popular and enduring stories involve an underdog who overcomes great obstacles and secures victory against the odds. Arguably the most famous of such stories is the unlikely triumph of David—the young Israelite shepherd—against the battle-hardened Philistine war machine, the nine-foot-nine Goliath of Gath. Even though many people have heard about “David versus Goliath” in the media, the actual details of the story in 1Sam 17 are less widely known. According to the biblical story, the Philistines and Israelites were locked in a heated struggle over a limited amount of land. The Philistines enjoyed a technological advantage (see 1Sam 13:16-22) and usually held the upper hand, but in this case the tables were turned.

How is Goliath characterized in this episode?

Most English translations call Goliath a “champion” in 1Sam 17:4, a paraphrase of a Hebrew expression that can more literally be rendered “a man of the place between.” If a combatant remains standing in the space between two armies at the end of the battle, such a person is a champion, and the implication is that Goliath has been effective in many such conflicts. Goliath’s immense stature must be a reason for such success, but he is also heavily armored as he approaches the Israelite troops. Such a long description of a warrior’s accoutrements—beginning with Goliath’s helmet, then moving down to the coat of mail and bronze greaves on his legs—is uncommon in the Hebrew Bible. In fact, this portrait is much closer to depictions of warrior-heroes in Greek literature and in this case points to the Hellenistic roots of the Philistines.

But Goliath is also from the city of Gath, and according to Josh 11:22, Gath is home to the “Anakites,” an ancient race of fearsome giants. Consequently, Goliath is pictured as the ultimate hybrid figure: a Greek warrior not unlike Achilles and a member of an ancient race of giants who struck terror into the Israelites moving toward the land of their inheritance (see Deut 1:28). Whoever takes on Goliath faces a formidable foe indeed. As if the description of Goliath’s ancestry and weaponry were not enough, he is also presented as an intimidating speaker who verbally assaults the army of Israel and David himself, before any actual fighting: “Come to me, and I will give your flesh to the birds of the air and to the wild animals of the field” (1Sam 17:44).

What happens to the head of Goliath?

Goliath challenges the Israelites to choose a fighter to face him one on one, with the losing nation to become slaves of the other. Even for an experienced fighter this represents a daunting task, and David has to first convince Saul that he is equal to the task. Testifying about his prowess against lions and bears, David’s speech is impressive, and Saul agrees to allow him to enter the ring. Even more impressive are David’s words to Goliath, asserting that the battle belongs to God and that he intends to use the giant’s own sword to decapitate him (1Sam 17:45-47). It should be noted that David rejects the offer of Saul’s armor, but he does have a slingshot in his hand, a weapon customarily identified with Benjamin, Saul’s own tribe (see Judg 20:15-16). David also takes a shepherd’s staff in his other hand, an implement that in 1Sam 17:43 provides Goliath with a canine insult: “Am I a dog, that you come to me with sticks?” But it seems that David is merely using the staff as a distraction, and evidently Goliath takes the bait and does not see the well-aimed rock that hits his forehead, causing him to fall face-first to the ground.

Like an athlete who guarantees victory before the game, true to his word, David cuts off the head of the Philistine with the giant’s own sword. But Goliath’s head is subject to an interesting postmortem journey, for according to 1Sam 17:54 David carries the head to Jerusalem. At this point in the larger story, Jerusalem is a non-Israelite city, and even though it is in the heart of the promised land, no Israelite has conquered it. In 2Sam 5, David will successfully invade it, rename it “the city of David,” and transform it into the national capital. Thus the head of Goliath in 1Sam 17 acts as a kind of security deposit, anticipating David’s larger achievement and installation as the king of all Israel.

Keith Bodner, "David and Goliath", n.p. [cited 22 Feb 2017]. Online: http://bibleodyssey.org/en/passages/main-articles/david-and-goliath

Contributors

Keith Bodner

Keith Bodner
Professor, Crandall University

Keith Bodner is professor of religious studies at Crandall University in New Brunswick, Canada. His recent books include Elisha’s Profile in the Book of the Kings (Oxford University Press, 2013) and The Rebellion of Absalom (Routledge, 2013).

Using just a stick and a stone, the underdog David defeats the Philistine champion Goliath in one of the Bible’s best-known stories.

Did you know…?

  • The Philistine takes his stand for 40 days in 1Sam 17:16, reminding the reader that at the end of 40 days Noah opened the window of the ark that he had made (Gen 8:6) and that Moses spent 40 days on Mount Sinai (Exod 24:18)—David is in elite biblical company when he faces the giant.
  • The Greek Septuagint lists Goliath’s height approximately three feet shorter.
  • When Goliath curses David “by his gods” in 1Sam 17:43, it is conceivable that one of these gods is the Philistine deity Dagon. Goliath and Dagon have something in common: in 1Sam 5:4, Dagon loses his head (before the ark of the covenant), and Goliath loses his head in the confrontation with David.
  • There is some debate as to why David chooses five stones. Some argue that he picks one stone for each of the five books of the Torah, others suggest that Goliath has four brothers, and still other interpreters suggest a more practical reason: in case he misses the mark.
  • Scholars note a tension between this story (1Sam 17) and the one in 2Sam 21:19-22, which reports that a certain Elhanan son of Jaare-oregim killed Goliath.
  • The sword of Goliath shows up again in 1Sam 21:9, when David retrieves it as he is fleeing from Saul and takes it with him while he hides in the city of Gath, the very hometown of Goliath himself.

Relating to or associated with people living in the territory of the northern kingdom of Israel during the divided monarchy, or more broadly describing the biblical descendants of Jacob.

1Sam 17

David and Goliath
1Now the Philistines gathered their armies for battle; they were gathered at Socoh, which belongs to Judah, and encamped between Socoh and Aze ... View more

1Sam 13:16-22

16Saul, his son Jonathan, and the people who were present with them stayed in Geba of Benjamin; but the Philistines encamped at Michmash.17And raiders came out ... View more

A West Semitic language, in which most of the Hebrew Bible is written except for parts of Daniel and Ezra. Hebrew is regarded as the spoken language of ancient Israel but is largely replaced by Aramaic in the Persian period.

The set of Biblical books shared by Jews and Christians. A more neutral alternative to "Old Testament."

Of or relating to Greek culture, especially ancient Greece after Alexander the Great.

1Sam 17:4

4And there came out from the camp of the Philistines a champion named Goliath, of Gath, whose height was six cubits and a span.

Josh 11:22

22None of the Anakim was left in the land of the Israelites; some remained only in Gaza, in Gath, and in Ashdod.

Deut 1:28

28Where are we headed? Our kindred have made our hearts melt by reporting, ‘The people are stronger and taller than we; the cities are large and fortified up to ... View more

1Sam 17:44

44The Philistine said to David, “Come to me, and I will give your flesh to the birds of the air and to the wild animals of the field.”

The land that Yahweh promised to Abraham in Genesis, also called Canaan.

1Sam 17:45-47

45But David said to the Philistine, “You come to me with sword and spear and javelin; but I come to you in the name of the Lord of hosts, the God of the armies ... View more

Judg 20:15-16

15On that day the Benjaminites mustered twenty-six thousand armed men from their towns, besides the inhabitants of Gibeah.16Of all this force, there were seven ... View more

1Sam 17:43

43The Philistine said to David, “Am I a dog, that you come to me with sticks?” And the Philistine cursed David by his gods.

1Sam 17:54

54David took the head of the Philistine and brought it to Jerusalem; but he put his armor in his tent.

2Sam 5

David Anointed King of All Israel
1Then all the tribes of Israel came to David at Hebron, and said, “Look, we are your bone and flesh.2For some time, while Saul ... View more

1Sam 17

David and Goliath
1Now the Philistines gathered their armies for battle; they were gathered at Socoh, which belongs to Judah, and encamped between Socoh and Aze ... View more

People who study a text from historical, literary, theological and other angles.

1Sam 17:16

16For forty days the Philistine came forward and took his stand, morning and evening.

Gen 8:6

6At the end of forty days Noah opened the window of the ark that he had made

Exod 24:18

18Moses entered the cloud, and went up on the mountain. Moses was on the mountain for forty days and forty nights.

1Sam 17:43

43The Philistine said to David, “Am I a dog, that you come to me with sticks?” And the Philistine cursed David by his gods.

1Sam 5:4

4But when they rose early on the next morning, Dagon had fallen on his face to the ground before the ark of the Lord, and the head of Dagon and both his hands w ... View more

1Sam 17

David and Goliath
1Now the Philistines gathered their armies for battle; they were gathered at Socoh, which belongs to Judah, and encamped between Socoh and Aze ... View more

2Sam 21:19-22

19Then there was another battle with the Philistines at Gob; and Elhanan son of Jaare-oregim, the Bethlehemite, killed Goliath the Gittite, the shaft of whose s ... View more

1Sam 21:9

9The priest said, “The sword of Goliath the Philistine, whom you killed in the valley of Elah, is here wrapped in a cloth behind the ephod; if you will take tha ... View more

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