shofar

shofar (Shoh´fahr)

A musical instrument made out of the horn of an animal. The biblical shofar was a ram’s horn (Josh 6:4-13). The shofar is mentioned many times in the Bible, beginning with (Exod 19:16), the revelation at Mt. Sinai, where the loud blast of the horn caused the people to tremble in fear. The Israelites were commanded that when they entered the land God would give them, they were to proclaim the Jubilee Year with a blast of the shofar (Lev 25:9). In the Bible, the shofar most often signifies an important announcement or a call to arms (Judg 3:27) and was the means by which Joshua conquered the city of Jericho (Josh 6:4-5). As an instrument, the shofar was also used as part of a musical ensemble (Ps 98:6). In the Jerusalem Temple, the ram’s horn was an integral part of the rituals.

Josh 6:4-13

4with seven priests bearing seven trumpets of rams' horns before the ark. On the seventh day you shall march around the city seven times, the priests blowing th ... View more

Exod 19:16

16On the morning of the third day there was thunder and lightning, as well as a thick cloud on the mountain, and a blast of a trumpet so loud that all the peopl ... View more

Lev 25:9

9Then you shall have the trumpet sounded loud; on the tenth day of the seventh month—on the day of atonement—you shall have the trumpet sounded throughout all y ... View more

Judg 3:27

27When he arrived, he sounded the trumpet in the hill country of Ephraim; and the Israelites went down with him from the hill country, having him at their head.

Josh 6:4-5

4with seven priests bearing seven trumpets of rams' horns before the ark. On the seventh day you shall march around the city seven times, the priests blowing th ... View more

Ps 98:6

6With trumpets and the sound of the horn
make a joyful noise before the King, the Lord.

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