Moab, Moabites

Moab, Moabites (Moh´ab, moh´uh-bits)

Lot’s son born from an incestuous relationship with his elder daughter (Gen 19:30-38) and the people descended from him. They were closely linked with their northern neighbors, the Ammonites (descended from Moab’s half brother, Ben-ammi), with whom they later shared a border. The Moabite king Balak hired a prophet/diviner named Balaam to curse the Israelites (Num 22-24). Israel camped in the plains of Moab before entering the promised land (Num 35:1; Deut 1:5), and this brief sojourn was remembered as detrimental to Israelite religion (Num 25). In Judges, a Moabite king named Eglon extends his control over Benjaminites and is assassinated (Judg 3:12-30). The story of Ruth, also set in the period of the judges, tells of how a Moabite woman became King David’s great-grandmother. Both Saul and David fought with the Moabites, the latter subduing them (1Sam 14:47; 2Sam 8:2). After the time of David, Moab is mentioned only occasionally (2Kgs 3; 2Kgs 13:20; 2Kgs 24:2; Isa 15-16; Jer 48; Zeph 2:8-11).

Gen 19:30-38

* Invalid citation format *

Num 22-24

* Invalid citation format *

Num 35:1

* Invalid citation format *

Deut 1:5

* Invalid citation format *

Num 25

* Invalid citation format *

Judg 3:12-30

* Invalid citation format *

1Sam 14:47

* Invalid citation format *

2Sam 8:2

* Invalid citation format *

2Kgs 3

* Invalid citation format *

2Kgs 13:20

* Invalid citation format *

2Kgs 24:2

* Invalid citation format *

Isa 15-16

* Invalid citation format *

Jer 48

* Invalid citation format *

Zeph 2:8-11

* Invalid citation format *

 NEH Logo
Bible Odyssey has been made possible in part by the National Endowment for the Humanities: Exploring the human endeavor
Any views, findings, conclusions, or recommendations expressed in this website, do not necessarily represent those of the National Endowment for the Humanities.