Jehoiada

Jehoiada (Ji-hoi´uh-duh)

1 The chief priest in the days of Athaliah and Joash of Judah (early eighth century BCE). After King Ahaziah died, his mother, Athaliah (Ahab’s daughter), took the throne. Jehoiada led a conspiracy to anoint Joash king, restoring the crown to the house of David (2Chr 23:1-7; 2Chr 23:20). Jehoiada’s fame may be remembered in (Jer 29:26). He was the father of Zechariah, who prophesied against Judah’s apostasy. 2 A chief priest (1Chr 12:27; 1Chr 27:5), the father of Benaiah, the chief of David’s elite mercenaries (2Sam 8:18) and the head of the army under Solomon (1Kgs 2:35). 3 A high priest in the time of Nehemiah (Neh 13:28).

2Chr 23:1-7

1But in the seventh year Jehoiada took courage, and entered into a compact with the commanders of the hundreds, Azariah son of Jeroham, Ishmael son of Jehohanan ... View more

2Chr 23:20

20And he took the captains, the nobles, the governors of the people, and all the people of the land, and they brought the king down from the house of the Lord, ... View more

Jer 29:26

26The Lord himself has made you priest instead of the priest Jehoiada, so that there may be officers in the house of the Lord to control any madman who plays th ... View more

1Chr 12:27

27Jehoiada, leader of the house of Aaron, and with him three thousand seven hundred.

1Chr 27:5

5The third commander, for the third month, was Benaiah son of the priest Jehoiada, as chief; in his division were twenty-four thousand.

2Sam 8:18

18Benaiah son of Jehoiada was over the Cherethites and the Pelethites; and David's sons were priests.

1Kgs 2:35

35The king put Benaiah son of Jehoiada over the army in his place, and the king put the priest Zadok in the place of Abiathar.

Neh 13:28

28And one of the sons of Jehoiada, son of the high priest Eliashib, was the son-in-law of Sanballat the Horonite; I chased him away from me.

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