Gilead

Gilead (Gil´ee-uhd)

A region in the Transjordan (modern Jordan) from the Arnon to the Yarmuk River, between Bashan and Moab. Southern Gilead (from the Arnon to the Jabbok) was under the control of Sihon, the king of the Amorites in the Mosaic period (thirteenth century BCE). It was assigned to the Israelite tribes of Reuben and Gad in the division of the land, and later corresponded approximately to the kingdoms of the Ammonites, with their capital at Rabbath-ammon (modern Amman), and Moab. Northern Gilead (from the Jabbok to the Yarmuk) was assigned to Manasseh and remained under Israelite control until the Assyrian conquest (721 BCE), although both the Ammonites to the south and the Arameans to the north occupied it at times (Judg 10:8; 1Kgs 22:3; Amos 1:3). The exact composition of the proverbial “balm of Gilead” (Jer 8:22; Gen 37:25) has not been definitely established.

Judg 10:8

8and they crushed and oppressed the Israelites that year. For eighteen years they oppressed all the Israelites that were beyond the Jordan in the land of the Am ... View more

1Kgs 22:3

3The king of Israel said to his servants, “Do you know that Ramoth-gilead belongs to us, yet we are doing nothing to take it out of the hand of the king of Aram ... View more

Amos 1:3

3Thus says the Lord:
For three transgressions of Damascus,
and for four, I will not revoke the punishment;
because they have threshed Gilead
with threshing sled ... View more

Jer 8:22

22Is there no balm in Gilead?
Is there no physician there?
Why then has the health of my poor people
not been restored?

Gen 37:25

25Then they sat down to eat; and looking up they saw a caravan of Ishmaelites coming from Gilead, with their camels carrying gum, balm, and resin, on their way ... View more

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